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Re: Ballistic Theory and the Sagnac Experiment

Subject: Re: Ballistic Theory and the Sagnac Experiment
From: Henri Wilson
Date: Wed, 29 Mar 2006 21:24:11 GMT
Newsgroups: sci.astro, sci.physics.relativity, sci.physics
On 28 Mar 2006 19:55:53 -0800, "jgreenfield@xxxxxxxxxxx" <jgreen@xxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

>
>Henri Wilson wrote:
>> On 27 Mar 2006 18:58:04 -0800, "jgreenfield@xxxxxxxxxxx" <jgreen@xxxxxxxxxxx>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >Henri Wilson wrote:
>> >> On 26 Mar 2006 23:58:04 -0800, "George Dishman" <george@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >Henri Wilson wrote:
>> >> >...
>> >> >> Wilson does not agree with Einstein.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Wilson agrees with Ritz..... who effectively said that in any one 
>> >> >> frame, TWLS =
>> >> >> OWLS = c.
>> >> >
>> >> >Careful Henry, not "in any one frame", only "in the rest
>> >> >frame of the source" and only if the other equipment
>> >> >is also at rest. Bounce the light off a moving mirror for
>> >> >example and the reflected one-way speed will probably
>> >> >be affected but with those qualifications you are right.
>> >>
>> >> I have made it quite clear before that by 'any one frame' I mean 
>> >> everything in
>> >> the experiment is in the one frame. That naturally implies source, mirror 
>> >> and
>> >> detector are mutually at rest.
>> >>
>> >> Even Androcles should be able to understand that.
>> >>
>> >> Incidentally, this is only true in flat gravity. If for instance the 
>> >> experiment
>> >> were carries out vertically, average OWLS would still equals average TWLS 
>> >> but
>> >> would have a value less than the constant c.
>> >>
>> >> The 'hushed-up' Venus radar experiment verified this.
>> >
>> >Wasn't to do with gravity H.
>>
>> Not so fast Jim.
>>
>> >The earth's spin added / subtracted to the signal time of travel
>> >(less time with radar approaching venus, and opposite.
>>
>> Well, this is interesting Jim. What are you assuming to be the speed of the
>> reflected beam?
>> Is it c wrt Venus... or does the planet behave like a mirror and reflect the
>> beam at double the incident speed to (c + 2v) wrt Earth, where v is Venus's
>> speed towards earth?
>>
>> Gravity could make a considerable difference. Light slows while escaping 
>> Earth
>> then speeds up as it approaches Venus. It does the opposite on the return 
>> trip.
>> If the travel times for each leg are significantly different - and they could
>> be - then so might be the effect due to gravity. I doubt if this would be
>> anything like 500 kms though.
>>
>> >Simultaneous measurements of distance to venus varied by (500kms?)
>> >placing the planet at two locations at once
>>
>> >http://surf.de.uu.net/bookland/sci/farce/farce_6
>>
>> That wont open. Check the address, please Jim.
>
>Sorry: My ballsup
>http://surf.de.uu.net/bbokland/sci/farce/farce_6.html

No it still wont open.
They mustn't like me.

>>
>> >
>> >Jim G
>> >c'=c+v
>> 
>> 
>> HW.
>> www.users.bigpond.com/hewn/index.htm


HW.
www.users.bigpond.com/hewn/index.htm



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