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Re: Polynesian origins (Re: Teouma skeletons...

Subject: Re: Polynesian origins (Re: Teouma skeletons...
From: benlizross
Date: Sun, 07 Aug 2005 10:34:12 +1200
Newsgroups: sci.archaeology, sci.anthropology.paleo
Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> 
> benlizross wrote:
> >
> > Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> > >
> > > benlizross wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > benlizross wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Hello, Qiwi!
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Long time no talk...
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > I see that you've been posting some interesting new evidence
> > > > > > > about the matters Polynesian.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Myself, I've been busy with lots of other stuff, but now and
> > > > > > > then I do check sci.arch for the latest merriment.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > qiwi wrote on 29 Jul 2005 in
> > > > > > > <1122682610.098353.163250@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>:
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > The fact is there is only one word in the Polynesian language 
> > > > > > > > that has
> > > > > > > > been traced to an exact and provable point of origin outside the
> > > > > > > > Pacific region and that word is the generic Polynesian term for 
> > > > > > > > the
> > > > > > > > sweet potato, 'Kumara'.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Well, there's certainly more than one such word... For
> > > > > > > example, how about the old mausoleums known as tupa on
> > > > > > > Rapanui and as chullpa in S. America?
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > They are both mausoleums, the word is nearly the same, and
> > > > > > > they often look the same in both places,
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > http://www.trends.net/~yuku/tran/8pb2.htm
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I would suggest an alternative to Yuri's expurgated version. Google
> > > > > > Groups has the whole discussion, including the fact that the tupa 
> > > > > > were
> > > > > > not mausoleums.
> > > > >
> > > > > What you probably meant to say is that these structures were
> > > > > also used for other purposes later on...
> > > >
> > > > No, alas, I meant to say what I said -- that there has been no finding
> > > > of human remains in any of the structures called "tupa" on Rapanui. Your
> > > > repeated denial of this fact arises from a confusion in your mind
> > > > between tupa and a different kind of structure, the hare moa -- a
> > > > confusion which is an original contribution of yours to the discussion,
> > > > since even Heyerdahl does not share it.
> > >
> > > Really?
> > >
> > > So what is the difference between tupa and hare moa,
> > > according to you?
> >
> > Go back to the earlier discussion if you've forgotten. Or look it up in
> > the books. The booklet by A.Elena Charola (Easter Island: The Heritage
> > and its Conservation, World Monuments Fund, 1994) is particularly useful
> > on the different types of structure.
> 
> You've got to state your case clearer, Ross. Do you deny
> that there are tupas on Rapanui?

Don't be silly, Yuri. That is where the word "tupa" comes from. I
strongly recommend you get hold of Charola or some other informative
book and get yourself clued up on this matter.

Ross Clark

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