sci.archaeology
[Top] [All Lists]

Re: Polynesian origins (Re: Teouma skeletons...

Subject: Re: Polynesian origins (Re: Teouma skeletons...
From: benlizross
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2005 08:52:09 +1200
Newsgroups: sci.archaeology, sci.anthropology.paleo
Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> 
> benlizross wrote:
> >
> > Yuri Kuchinsky wrote:
> > >
> > > richardparker01@xxxxxxxxx wrote:
> 
> > > > Is there any similarity between NW Canadian native languages and
> > > > Hawaiian or Maori? Are there any common words?
> > >
> > > Richard,
> > >
> > > This question is rather complicated. To begin with, there
> > > are a great many Native languages on the Pacific Coast of
> > > Canada. In fact, there are many language families there!
> > > (Some of them already nearly extinct.)
> > >
> > > It would take many years to study these languages, and to
> > > compare them with those of Polynesia. Nobody is doing this
> > > work now, although some linguists of the past did find
> > > numerous parallels between the Native Canadian languages of
> > > the area and the Polynesian languages. See in particular
> > > about the work of Hill-Tout. Some of this info can be found
> > > here,
> > >
> > > Polynesians and Canada
> > >      http://www.trends.ca/~yuku/tran/nwc.htm
> > >
> > > There are all too many bigoted academic scholars who are
> > > dismissive of the talents and abilities of the Native
> > > Canadians. They dismiss out of hand the clear archaeological
> > > and anthropological connections between these cultures. So
> > > if they are shameless enough to do that, what use is it to
> > > even begin to deal with the issues of linguistics, that are
> > > by their own nature far more complicated and
> > > time-consuming...
> > >
> > > These are the spiritual children of Bishop Landa (see the
> > > sig).
> > >
> > > Regards,
> > >
> > > Yuri.
> > >
> > > Yuri Kuchinsky  -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku
> > >
> > > We found a large number of books in these characters
> > > and, as they contained nothing in which there were not
> > > to be seen superstition and lies of the devil, we burned
> > > them all, which they regretted to an amazing degree.
> > > --  Bishop Diego de Landa on his dealings with the Mayans.
> >
> > As you can probably tell from Yuri's increasingly deranged abuse of the
> > people who don't accept his theories, his web site is not where you
> > would look for a rational and balanced examination of this matter. When
> > you've had a look at it, I recommend you follow the discussion of the
> > work of Hill-Tout and Campbell which went on for some considerable time
> > on this group. (I can even send you some comments on it which I wrote at
> > the time.) The upshot of it is that there are no more resemblances
> > between Polynesian and any known language of the NW coast than between
> > any two languages chosen at random.
> 
> This is incorrect.
> 
> The evidence below from Goldman, that I've already quoted,
> refutes your statement already!
> 
> [quote]
> 
> Irving Goldman, THE MOUTH OF HEAVEN: AN
> INTRODUCTION TO KWAKIUTL RELIGIOUS
> THOUGHT, John Wiley & Sons, NY, 1975.
> 
> "The Kwakiutl do in fact reveal specific Polynesian
> traits in respect to rank and kinship. The title ate,
> translated as "lord" seems cognate with Polynesian ati
> with a similar meaning; Kwakiutl have a talking chief
> (elk) who corresponds in function to the Polynesian
> counterpart. Kwakiutl kinship has the common
> Polynesian usages of a single term for siblings of
> opposite sex, and of differentiating by relative seniority
> siblings of same but not those of opposite sex.
> Also, with respect to kinship, Kwakiutl and Polynesian
> societies have similar terms (-tsaya, -taina) for younger
> siblings of the same sex."
> 
> [unquote]
> 
> Congratulations, Dr. Ross, you've just failed your
> linguistics exam! :(
> 
> > In other words, linguistic evidence
> > fails to support the Heyerdahl-Kuchinsky view of Polynesian origins.
> >
> > Ross Clark
> 
> Are you sure you're really a linguist?
> 
> Yuri.
> 
> Yuri Kuchinsky  -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku/bbl/bbl.htm
> 
> Not ignorance, but ignorance of ignorance, is the
> death of knowledge -- Alfred North Whitehead

[Sigh] Yuri, your pretensions to know something about linguistics used
to have a kind of amusement value, flying so boldly in the face of
reality. Now they're just a re-run, like everything else you've said in
the present discussion. We have been over Goldman's two words before,
and no, they do not rise above the level of chance resemblance. 

Ross Clark

<Prev in Thread] Current Thread [Next in Thread>