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Re: New Australopith Find From Wooded Habitat

Subject: Re: New Australopith Find From Wooded Habitat
From: "spiznet"
Date: 4 May 2006 15:10:08 -0700
Newsgroups: sci.anthropology.paleo
rmacfarl wrote:
> Day Brown wrote:
> > rmacfarl wrote:
> > > Day Brown wrote:
> > >
> > >>Rich Travsky wrote:
> > >>
> > >>> http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v440/n7086/full/nature04629.html
> > >
> > > ...
> > >
> > >
> > >>Well, Kewl. Then these pot bellied hominids saw the habitat shrinkage
> > >>referred to in "Children of the Ice Age"...
> > >
> > >
> > > Errh, no. Steve Stanley in "Children of the Ice Age" was writing about
> > > the transition from Australopithecus to Homo, at the beginning of the
> > > Pleistocene, 2.5-2 MYA. This article is referring to the putative
> > > Ardipithecus - Australopithecus transition about 2 million years
> > > earlier...
> > I expect the process was the same; climate change and fragmented gene
> > pools. There never were very many hominids, so relatively minor changes
> > would have a much greater effect.
> ...
>
> Oh no, you don't get away that easily. You didn't say that the hominids
> saw habitat shrinkage "similar to" what Stanley was writing about. What
> you had said before was that they "saw *the habitat shrinkage* referred
> to in 'Children of the Ice Age' " (my emphasis).
>
> In any case, while part of Stanley's hypothesis in Children of The Ice
> Age was to link speciation to climate change (hardly revolutionary),
> the main hypothesis he put forward was about the drivers for the shift
> from Australopithecus to Homo.
>
> Stanley explained the a'pith / homo shift to the process of brain
> growth with a shift from partial arboreality to obligate
> terrestriality, because large homo brains are associated with babies
> being born relatively helpless (human infants' brains, unlike apes',
> grow at foetal rate for their first year of life, when they double in
> size). More altricial infants would have been unable to cling to their
> mothers as they "bolted up the nearest acacia" to escaping a marauding
> feline.
>
> Please don't make a false statement and then when called on it, try to
> wriggle out by claiming what you were talking about was "much the
> same". Such behaviour marks you as a potential netloon, whose words are
> to be regarded with suspicion...
>
> Ross Macfarlane

I would regard every post by anyone with suspicion until such time as
it becomes clear!
-Spiznet


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