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RE: Apache Server (Oracle)

Subject: RE: Apache Server Oracle
From: "Michael Velez"
Date: Fri, 22 Dec 2006 10:19:45 -0500
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: redhat-list-bounces@xxxxxxxxxx 
> [mailto:redhat-list-bounces@xxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Gaddis, Jeremy L.
> Sent: Friday, December 22, 2006 10:05 AM
> To: General Red Hat Linux discussion list
> Subject: Re: Apache Server (Oracle)
> 
> On 12/22/06, mark <mroth@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> > Actually, speaking of Oracle, and startup scripts, anyone know what 
> > the correct runlevel is to start Oracle - 1? 2? 3?
> 
> Um, whichever runlevel you're running in?  There is no right or wrong.
>  I may very well be wrong, but I believe Red Hat defaults to 
> runlevel 5.  For my servers, I always either 1) change this 
> to runlevel 3, or
> 2) disable the startup of X11 in the default runlevel.  A 
> quick check shows a number of my servers at runlevel 3.
> 
> If you want Oracle to startup automatically after the server 
> boots up, you'll want to enable startup for whatever your 
> default runlevel is (which can be found in /etc/inittab).
> 
>

I've always used run-levels as the following:

1: single-user
2: multi-user (stand-alone)
3: multi-user (networked)
5: X applications

I've actually never used 4 myself, but I guess somebody can customize it to
a combination of 3 and 5.

So I guess oracle can be used anywhere from 2 to 5 but I usually set it to
345 since I consider runlevel 3 the first server level.  Runlevel 2 was the
standard (and topmost) runlevel 20 years ago when things like NFS were not
prevalent.

DISCLAIMER: I am no longer an IT professional and would defer to the current
professionals on the list.

That's my take,
Michael

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