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[AAACE-NLA] libraries as the center for community literacy

Subject: [AAACE-NLA] libraries as the center for community literacy
From: Paul Rogers
Date: Thu, 10 Jun 2010 09:58:50 -0700 PDT
Merle et al,
In my opinion libraries can serve as a focal point for all the literacy programs provided by adult education in any community.
In order to get the funding that is needed, a sound proposal has to be presented to the decision makers that would describe the following:
1. Many if not all libraries offer literacy classes to adults.
2. By now all libraries have computer labs and offer computer literacy classes.
3. Some libraries provide ESL classes both with tutors and online. There are many online courses avaiable and it does not take much effort to catalogue them for adult students.
What needs to be added are classes in literacy in languages other than English.
4. Finally, a library can very easily serve as a reference to its patrons who are looking for various kinds of classes. For example, many ESL students do not know where and when classes are offered by adult ed programs, city colleges, churches, community centers, etc.
The library can be the starting point.
FUNDING:
Many foundations are particularly interested in providing their funds to programs that show a collaborative effort. A library could be the coordinating agency for any city's literacy classes.
Decision makers in government not only want to save money but to make sure that the money is spent efficiently. Libraries are usually very efficient, and, with an active volunteer tutorial component, very low cost.
Paul Rogers
PUMAROSA.COM


--- On Wed, 6/9/10, Merle Ayres <merleayres@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

From: Merle Ayres <merleayres@xxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: [AAACE-NLA] AAACE-NLA Digest, Vol 85, Issue 8
To: aaace-nla@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Wednesday, June 9, 2010, 3:57 PM

As a member of the Iowa Library Association Adult Literacy is discussed at some national meetings. Most of the time Advocacy issues come up when money gets tight. We spend so much time positioning that we drive the legislatures away. We need to build relationships with congressmen and state legislatures over the long term. Teacher are good at this cause they network and teach together and lobby their legislature often. 

 Iowa is going through education and library cuts and with its infrastructure. The library association at least gets to form a new formula to deliver its services directed by the Iowa Legislature. That seems to be that they have enough confidence in us to do it ourselves than let it go to a floor debate where it could be bad  as never know what will become of a bill . It's like dehydration on a hike and when your thirsty its too late. What is the past advocacy efforts by adult literacy to build upon what you need and want?
 

Friend to Fossils
Merle Ayres
412 8th St. North
Humboldt, Iowa 50548
515-332-4630





> From: aaace-nla-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: AAACE-NLA Digest, Vol 85, Issue 8
> To: aaace-nla@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2010 17:16:52 -0400
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> Today's Topics:
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> 1. Re: Advocacy for Adult Education (Art LaChance)
> 2. Announcement: June 2010 Issue of LINCS Resource Collection
> News (Kaye Beall)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 09 Jun 2010 11:30:50 -0500
> From: Art LaChance <ruhtra.glc@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: National Literacy Advocacy List sponsored by AAACE
> <aaace-nla@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: Re: [AAACE-NLA] Advocacy for Adult Education
> Message-ID: <4C0FC1BA.8060402@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>
> Tom,
> I've followed most of your efforts for many years and I've always been
> quite impressed by your dedication.
>
> I was trained in the philosophies of mechanic, machinist, and
> electronics repair from childhood through 23 yrs Navy. The primary point
> of which trained me to look not at the symptomatology but to utilize the
> outcome and return to the actual source of the issue. During a second
> career in Rehabilitation Counseling I tried to follow the same processes
> and in most cases was instrumental in helping the disadvantaged find a
> productive seat in our demanding society. I've been directly involved in
> adult literacy for over 20 years now and I've been a member of several
> "list-serves" dedicated to LD and/or Adult Literacy in general. The
> singular issue that keeps popping up over and over again goes directly
> against my early training and it just baffles me as to why we don't
> follow the systematic troubleshooting that would permit us to return to
> the "source" of this monster and defray it. All I've seen is repetitive
> discussion that remains centered on the 53 different methodologies for
> fixing a flat tire. Any time anybody enters the conversation with
> suggestion to return to the actual source of the problem - they get
> pushed off to the side - and your description of the standard beliefs
> that appear to stand in the way is quite accurate and I think that maybe
> a lot of us hang onto those beliefs simply to maintain group identity.
> I quote your statements:
>
> 1. One of these beliefs is that the child?s brain and intelligence is basically formed by age 8 so why try to do anything about adult education.
>
> 2. Another belief is the belief that intelligence is genetic and so we won?t be able to do much about adult literacy and learning problems.
>
>
> I've seen a couple other beliefs that I simply stopped trying to
> influence from my level.
>
> 1. Uneducated families have uneducated children and there's nothing
> anybody can do about it.
> 2. Kids make dumb choices and they need to live with those decisions,
> and not spend our tax dollars to fix.
> 3. We have the best education system possible because many kids make
> straight A's - so anybody who cannot do that must not be
> capable................
> etc, etc, etc,
>
> So my point here is that our society in general must make a quantum
> changeover in it's understanding of the how, what, why of our
> educational system and shift away from plugging the flat-tire and start
> learning how to avoid sharp objects in the road.
>
> Art
>
>
>
>
>
>
> tsticht@xxxxxxxx wrote:
> > Colleagues: Advocacy for the Adult Education and Literacy System (AELS) of
> > the United States is sorely lacking amongst the profession of adult
> > education. Indeed, there has not even been an agreement on a name for the
> > AELS, which I define as the set of programs funded in part by the Adult
> > Education Act of 1966 and now by Title 2 of the Workforce Investment Act of
> > 1998 and its updates and changes. This is not the totality of programs for
> > adult literacy education in the U.S. but it is the only federal and state
> > education system for adults that is funded by taxpayer money.
> >
> > There is very little understanding of the existence of the AELS in the
> > general public, government policymakers, and, unfortunately, even among
> > those working in the field as adult educators. I have found this out from
> > surveys here in the San Diego area and from my numerous travels over the
> > last 15 years talking with thousands of those who work as adult educators
> > and with business and government officials.
> >
> > To go beyond my experience, there is a need for research on advocacy to
> > determine the extent to which the public recognizes the existence of the
> > AELS, what it does, how it is funded, levels of funding compared to other
> > taxpayer funded education systems (pre-K-12-16), and the general support
> > for the AELS. Despite 15 years of research by national, federally funded
> > adult research centers, nothing was done to conduct surveys or conduct
> > research to advance the education of the public about the AELS.
> >
> > Over the years I have undertaken a variety of activities to try to advance
> > the field of adult education including the writing of or contributing to
> > articles about adult education for newspapers such as USA Today, Washington
> > Post, etc., magazines such as Newsweek; I?ve done radio and TV interviews,
> > and more recently I?ve written articles online at EducationNews.org to try
> > to let those interested in education know something about adult literacy
> > education in the U.S.
> >
> > With closer proximity to advocating for funding for adult education I have
> > presented lectures to educate one or more members of state legislatures and
> > I have testified at hearings of the U.S. Congress.
> >
> > One thing I have done that has been helpful for those wishing to advocate
> > for adult education is to write brief research or commentary notes, such as
> > The ABC?s of Adult Literacy Education, that many local program providers
> > have reproduced and shared with local business and government officials.
> >
> > Another tactic I have used in my general advocacy strategy is to try to
> > overcome cultural beliefs that have hindered the understanding of and
> > commitment to adult literacy education. One of these beliefs is that the
> > child?s brain and intelligence is basically formed by age 8 so why try to
> > do anything about adult education. Another belief is the belief that
> > intelligence is genetic and so we won?t be able to do much about adult
> > literacy and learning problems. I have not found other adult educators
> > taking on these sorts of beliefs that have left adult education off the
> > agenda, or if admitted, it admitted only on the margins of education.
> > Unfortunately, I have not found adult educators taking on these sorts of
> > negative beliefs about adults? abilities to learn.
> >
> >
> > I am aware that none of the activities mentioned above are as effective in
> > the near term as directly working at the local and state level to educate
> > the public, business leaders, and government policymakers about the need
> > for and benefits of investing in adult literacy education. I chaired the
> > California Workforce Literacy Task Force in the early 1990s and produced a
> > report arguing for the importance of adult literacy education not just to
> > benefit the adults, but also their families, and especially their children.
> > But since that time, I have not come across similar task forces and reports
> > that can inform the public and policymakers about the value of adult
> > literacy education.
> >
> > It is also clear that immediate actions are often necessary to advocate for
> > adult education when the threat of cessation or reduction of funds for the
> > AELS at the federal or state level occurs. At this time, the mobilization
> > of adult students, educators, and others with understanding of the need for
> > adult literacy education is called for with direct contacts with
> > policymakers.
> >
> > I hope that this note and listing of activities for advocacy will give
> > others some ideas for advancing adult literacy education at national,
> > state, and local levels.
> >
> > Tom Sticht
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > AAACE-NLA mailing list: AAACE-NLA@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> > http://lists.literacytent.org/mailman/listinfo/aaace-nla
> > LiteracyTent: web hosting, news, community and goodies for literacy
> > http://literacytent.org
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 9 Jun 2010 12:37:29 -0500
> From: "Kaye Beall" <kabeall@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: <aaace-nla@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Subject: [AAACE-NLA] Announcement: June 2010 Issue of LINCS Resource
> Collection News
> Message-ID: <BE533E1E3F9A497AA477E568977A7621@D14J7YD1>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
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>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/>
> Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS)
>
>
>
>
> June 2010
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> LINCS Resource Collections <http://www.benchmarkemail.com/c/l?A4-236261602>
>
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_skills.html>
> Basic Skills
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_planning.html>
>
> <http://www.benchmarkemail.com/c/l?A4-236261604> Program Management
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_workforce.html>
> <http://www.benchmarkemail.com/c/l?A4-236261606> Workforce Competitiveness
>
>
>
> <http://www.benchmarkemail.com/c/l?A4-236261606>
>
>
>
>
> LINCS Regional Resource Centers
>
> Region 1
>
> Kaye Beall
>
> Boston, MA
>
> kaye_beall@xxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
> Tim Ponder
>
> Kent, OH
>
> tponder@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
> Region 2
>
> Beth Ponder
>
> Knoxville, TN
>
> baponder@xxxxxxx
>
>
> Region 3
>
> Paul Heavenridge
>
> Oakland, CA
>
> pheaven@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
>
>
> Welcome to LINCS Resource Collection News!
>
> Each month, we will feature one of the three LINCS Resource
> Collections-Basic Skills, Program Management, and Workforce
> Competitiveness-and introduce research-based resources that you can use in
> your adult and family literacy programs and classrooms. This edition
> features the
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_planning.html> Program
> Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning
> Disabilities, and Program Improvement.
>
> Save the date for an upcoming guest discussion on the
> <http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/Professionaldevelopment/> Professional
> Development Discussion List-Using Social Media in Teaching and Professional
> Development-July 12-August 6, 2010. Technology has changed what it means for
> learning communities to "be together." Digital tools are now an important
> part of teaching, learning, and professional development. But how do you
> keep pace with it all? Join Nell Eckersley, Jackie Taylor, and other guests,
> to explore popular social media tools available to you and how they may be
> used in teaching and professional development. Then sign up for a small
> group to learn how to use the social media tool of your choice. Learn
> alongside others and share ideas for teaching and learning. Small groups
> then share back what they learned with the
> <http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/Technology/> Technology and
> <http://www.nifl.gov/mailman/listinfo/Professionaldevelopment/> Professional
> Development Lists.
>
>
>
>
> What's New in the Program Management Collection?
>
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/abstracts/programplanning/RC_
> plan_abs40> Guidance and Career Counselors' Toolkit: Advising High School
> Students with Disabilities on Postsecondary Options is a toolkit intended to
> help guidance and career counselors to better assist high school students
> with disabilities to transition into postsecondary education and employment.
> Adults with learning disabilities and their supporters will also find the
> information and resources valuable in planning for entering postsecondary
> education and for career preparation.
>
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/abstracts/programplanning/RC_
> plan_abs37> One Step Forward Initiative - Guide to Adult Education for Work:
> Transforming Adult Education to Build a Skilled Workforce is a guide (based
> on background and research from the One Step Forward Initiative) that
> informs practitioners, policymakers, and employers about strategies and
> practices that transform their adult education programs into effective
> programs that transition low-skilled adults to work and postsecondary
> programs.
>
> The authors approach, "adult education for work," describes how a career
> pathways system could be structured by focusing on program quality elements
> in seven areas: Program Design, Curriculum and Instruction, Assessment and
> Credentialing, High-Quality Teaching, Support and Follow-Up Services that
> Encourage Access and Retention, Connections to the Business Community, and
> Monitoring and Accountability Systems. Also included in the Guide are
> benchmarks of promising practices and a self-assessment tool that program
> administrators can use to evaluate their program and plan strategically for
> needed change.
>
>
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/abstracts/programplanning/RC_
> plan_abs43> Some Consequences of Writing Assessment is an article that
> reviews research on ways that writing assessments in the United States have
> affected the way writing is taught. The author focuses on writing
> assessments given at the end of high school, but the points she makes are
> applicable to the adult literacy classroom. Tests may be high stakes for
> teachers and administrators but not for students. High stakes writing tests
> may be multiple choice, essay, or a combination of the two. High stakes
> writing tests usually have an impact, or "backwash" on writing curriculum
> and instruction. The kind of "backwash" depends on the kind of assessment.
>
>
> How can I learn more about the Program Management Collection?
>
> Visit the Program Management Collection at
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_planning.htm>
> http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/RC_planning.htm for additional
> resources. Contact the Program Management Collection content experts for
> additional information and to learn more about the resources, technical
> assistance, and professional development opportunities that are available at
> no cost. Assessment-Marie Cora, <mailto:marie.cora@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> marie.cora@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx; Learning Disabilities-Aaron Kohring,
> <mailto:akohring@xxxxxxx> akohring@xxxxxxx; Program Improvement-Gail Cope,
> <mailto:gcope@xxxxxxx> gcope@xxxxxxx
>
>
> What is LINCS?
>
> LINCS is a service of the National Institute for Literacy, providing online
> information and communication networks for adult and family literacy
> practitioners. LINCS' offerings include Discussion Lists, Regional Resource
> Centers, the Collections, and training opportunities. Learn more about
> LINCS on the Web site: <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs>
> http://www.nifl.gov/lincs
>
> What will I find in the New LINCS Resource Collections?
>
> The three new
> <http://www.nifl.gov/lincs/resourcecollections/resource_collections.html>
> LINCS Resource Collections, expanded this year, are comprised of items that
> have completed a rigorous internal and external review. Use these resources
> directly in the classroom or to guide development of customized programs and
> classes. You can find more information about the new Resource Collections on
> the Institute's Web site: <http://www.nifl.gov/> http://www.nifl.gov
>
>
>
> National Institute for Literacy
> 1775 I St. NW, Suite 730, Washington DC, 20006
> (202) 233-2025
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Kaye Beall
>
> Project Director
>
> World Education
>
> kaye_beall@xxxxxxxxxxx
>
> www.worlded.org
>
>
>
>
>
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